WVU Continues Offensive Line Build With Virginia Transfer

Ja'Quay Hubbard

West Virginia continued to bolster its offensive line outside of traditional channels when Ja’Quay Hubbard announced that WVU will be his transfer destination.

The 6-foot-5, 320-pounder hails from Sharpsville Area (PA) High School, which is on the western boarder of the state, approximately 75 miles northwest of Pittsburgh. There, he was a two-time all-state selection and a finalist for the state’s “Mr. Football” award before signing with Virginia.

Hubbard played two games during his 2019 true freshman season at Virginia, playing against Pitt and William & Mary, but was still able to redshirt. Coming out of high school, he picked the Cavaliers over Power 5 counterparts Louisville, Mississippi State, Pitt and Syracuse. He also had offers from Akron, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Eastern Kentucky, Liberty, Ohio, Temple, Toledo and Western Michigan.

Ja’Quay Hubbard

Along with the Panthers and Bulldogs, Michigan and Florida expressed interest in the big lineman after his transfer intentions became known in early July. However, West Virginia and its “Trust the Climb” process held sway, leading him to commit to WVU.

Hubbard told WKBN-TV that his decision to leave Virginia was “a business decision.”

Hubbard retained his redshirt after the 2019 season, and will have four years of eligibility at West Virginia. In order to play in 2020, he would need an NCAA waiver. If that does not transpire, he would have three years of eligibility remaining in 2021.

Home Page forums WVU Continues Offensive Line Build With Virginia Transfer

  • This topic has 15 replies, 8 voices, and was last updated by ButlereerButlereer.
Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #119815

    West Virginia continued to bolster its offensive line outside of traditional channels when Ja’Quay Hubbard announced that WVU will be his transfer des
    [See the full post at: WVU Continues Offensive Line Build With Virginia Transfer]

    #119822

    Watching film of Ja’Quay, he’s a monster. Big, powerful and moves well for someone his size. Nearly everyone in today’s world is getting a waiver from the NCAA to play immediately, so I doubt Hubbard will have to sit out a year despite the transfer. Entering WVU at this late date will probably make it hard for him to truly compete for a starting job this coming season, but if he’s eligibly to play, I’d expect him to see some game action this year. Adding someone of his ability to West Virginia’s offensive line pool for the next four years should be a huge benefit.

    #119827

    An excellent get.  Like the emphasis NB puts on both lines in his recruiting.  He’s got a solid background in that he understands that even in today’s game, the contest is won or lost in the trenches.

    #119830

    Welcome Mr. Hubbard!

    #119831

    Another big body on the OL.  LOVE the way NB is building this team from the trenches on both sides of the ball.  May not make the 2 deep this year, but with 4 years to play he provides depth for the future.

    #119837

    I totally agree Greg!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    #119843

    NB understands the meaning of in the trenches.

    #119846

    First HC that really understood this since Dandy Don.  Good Old Bill kind of got it but not as fast and not on both sides as NB.  Then again, Bill’s overhaul of the trenches was a little more drastic taking over from RR.  Dana’s jackwadian idea of what the trenches should look like wasn’t as drastically severe as RR’s.

    #119869

    Rod had some great talent on both sides of the trenches 🤷🏻‍♂️

    #119871

    Capers, Isdaner, Mozes, Barclay, Stanchek.

     

    Dykes, Miller, Neild, Hunter, Hardee, Wilson.

    #119875

    Correct, Montani, and there were more. While RR did pay more attention to the offense, he didn’t neglect the lines. A bit too much generalization here.

    For example, many point to Nehlen as routinely subbing in a second line on every third series to keep players fresh. While that did happen a good bit on the 88 team, it was far from a routine occurrence throughout his career. Still, the notion persists that he did it every year.

    #119876

    Another perception was that OL waited their turn till they were SR’s to start.  For many,  yes.  This is what my friend’s son told me.  He was an OL in the early 90’s.  Not quite true.  But it was evident that DN put more focus on OL.

    #119891

    I think maybe Butlereer’s point may have been hat Rod looked more fo smaller quicker linemen while Nehlen and Brown go for the big hawgs.

    #119908

    Correct CC.  And he didn’t have nearly the number of bodies on the team as DN.  Then on the D side his recruiting was more for athletes that he turned into DL.  FB’s, TE’s, LB’s that he bulked up.  Again he didn’t have nearly the numbers of most of the top P5 teams.

    #119963

    Agreed. Allan Johnson was the strength coach initially under Nehlen, and that was the first big boom in strength training in football as a more unified approach. Johnson was for strength and mass, as the thinking went at the time, and that’s why the pushing trucks and flipping tires, as well as high weights and low reps were the basis of the program.

    Approaches have changed over time, with Mike Barwis and Mike Joseph working more toward the athleticism and total approach, as well as injury prevention.

     

    #119971

    Smaller, quicker OL had their place in the RR era.  Same went for the DL.  But neither of those lines could stand up against the steam rollers in the B1G and SEC.  Those OL’s would just line up shoulder to shoulder and push you back 5 yds.  The DL’s would throw off the smallish OL like match sticks. Problem for us was that many of those teams bigs on both sides of the line not only had beef but speed.

     

Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Home Page forums WVU Continues Offensive Line Build With Virginia Transfer

Home Page forums WVU Continues Offensive Line Build With Virginia Transfer