Blocking and Tackling At Root Of WVU Loss

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  • #72076

    BlueGoldNews
    Muskets: 29

    Blocking and Tackling At Root Of WVU Loss MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — “It didn’t have anything to do with the play calling. It was all the same play calling
    [See the full post at: Blocking and Tackling At Root Of WVU Loss]

    #72097
    Oldguyeer
    Oldguyeer
    Muskets: 8,160
    Rank: Senior

    Well, other than minor things like blocking and tackling, this is a fundamentally sound, well-coached team.

    #72108
    Kevin Kinder
    Kevin Kinder
    Muskets: 8,975

    Your avatar says it all!

    #72109

    Cuyahoga Falls Eers
    Muskets: 32,790
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    It is akin to saying “The sun will rise in the East and set in the West.

    Actually, WVU’s sun set in the West and at night.

    I agree with Dana that this was the most atrocious, pitiful offense he has watched in 30 years. I think my memory would have to go back even more years than that for a comparable WVU inept, inexplicable, infuriating no-show. The WVU offensive line looked like toy hot wheels cars against real-sized tanks. And why in the hell did Grier run back 10 to 20 yards? For 1 1/2 years he would pass to someone or throw it away in 3 seconds. His scrambling put the defense in short fields far too often.

    Can you imagine a game in which the top 5 offense in the country, statistically, scored FIVE points (TD + PAT – safety)? A game in which special teams, with the blocked kick returned for a TD, outscored the offense? The defense, despite being on the field much longer than the Iowa State defense, gave up 28 points (2 on the offense). That should win most Big 12 games with the offense we saw last season and in the first 5 games this season.

    I put the hat 90% on the offense. Defense had flaws but if the offense performed to the level of the defense then WVU would have won the game.

    12 days to see if the season can be saved. I’ll be in Mountaineer Field when Baylor comes to town to see if the Resurrection begins.

    M agnificent Grier passes shredded Tennessee, 40-14
    O verhelmed drenched Youngstown, 52-17
    U nable to play North Carolina State because of Hurricane Florence
    N asty defense against Kansas State, 35-6
    T errific, then timid on offense against Texas Tech, 42-34
    A ntsy time for fans, vs. Kansas!, 38-22
    I ncomprehensible insanely indescribably inept offense against Iowa State, 14-30
    N ail Baylor
    E rectile dysfunction Texas
    E lectrify TCU
    R eam Oklahoma State
    S laughter Oklahoma

    #72116

    Ccteam
    Muskets: 68,349
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    Isaiah Hardy being one of the best 5 is a glaring weakness. No offense to him, and I think he can develop, but he is clearly not ready to play at a consistently high level this year. The offensive line is an area where you can build up 3 star recruits into good players, but it is likely to take until they are Juniors to be good enough for more than spot duty. Build their strength and fine tune their technique and don’t expect too many of them to be ready until they have at least two full years in the system. Many will take 3 years.

    #72117

    Ccteam
    Muskets: 68,349
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    Given the relative weakness of the offensive line, the play calling needs to accommodate with more quick release plays. So I disagree, at least in part, with the article’s premise. I agree blocking is a problem and will limit WV’s effectiveness, but you can’t keep calling plays that ask them to hold blocks longer than they are capable of.

    #72120
    Butlereer
    Butlereer
    Muskets: 82,060
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    Isaiah Hardy being one of the best 5 is a glaring weakness. No offense to him, and I think he can develop, but he is clearly not ready to play at a consistently high level this year. The offensive line is an area where you can build up 3 star recruits into good players, but it is likely to take until they are Juniors to be good enough for more than spot duty. Build their strength and fine tune their technique and don’t expect too many of them to be ready until they have at least two full years in the system. Many will take 3 years.

    Hardy not ready? You think he can develop? He’s a SR.

    Agree with your comment about 3* players being able to develop, but it does take a full 3 years of work BEFORE they can be consistently a P5 OL. Give them time with teir FR, RFR, SO seasons before they have to be thrown into the lineup as a JR and SR. Some ….. few …. will develop faster, some never will. But if you don’t have the numbers of recruits every year to fill those slots we end up with what we have this year. 3 guys capable….. two slots rotating guys that just aren’t there yet.

    14 schollie OL that includes 2 JC’s and 4 FR/RFR that have been thrown into the mix way too quickly just doesn’t cut it.

    #72121
    Butlereer
    Butlereer
    Muskets: 82,060
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    Given the relative weakness of the offensive line, the play calling needs to accommodate with more quick release plays. So I disagree, at least in part, with the article’s premise. I agree blocking is a problem and will limit WV’s effectiveness, but you can’t keep calling plays that ask them to hold blocks longer than they are capable of.

    Holgs took the arrow on this one. But it squarely lands on Spav’s lap. He has been given total reign over the O this year. 3rd and 4, run up the middle. 2 yds short. over and over and over again.

    #72134

    irishladdy
    Muskets: 6,980
    Rank: Senior

    “It didn’t have anything to do with the play calling. It was all the same play calling when we were gaining 600 yards. It had more to do with blocking, finishing blocks, coming out of cuts, and many other things.”

    I think that quote is concerning. It’s an oversimplification sure, but the inference here is that the only factors in a successful offense is in execution. The fact that it was the same play calling IS the problem. It seems to indicate a somewhat square peg, round hole philosophy to our offense… with “execution” being the only differences between success and failure.

    Adjusting to the defensive scheme and personnel is a huge part of offensive success. Even a perfectly executed play can fail, if it’s schematically not the right play.

    #72137
    Allen
    Allen
    Muskets: 4,615
    Rank: Junior

    Biggest problem with the offense game plan was the no adjustments during the game or at halftime. We seemed to have more success running off the tackles instead of up the gut. Did we continue with run off tackle? No. Why no slants or wide out screens to the sideline. No tight end play calls No rolling the QB to one side or the other. No putting two backs in back field instead of one. Defense side problem was continuing to blitz even when Iowa Stat had it stopped. Everyone stay back to block and they sent 1 receiver the tall kid who didn’t have to jump. If WVU would have rushed 3 or 4 and played tight zone or man with 2 deep.

    It’s amazing to me that no adjustments were made.

    #72145

    Ccteam
    Muskets: 68,349
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    My, thought Hardy was a youngster. Nevertheless, my main point stands. Relying on too many first and second year players on the line is a recipe for poor line play and WV seems to do it nearly every year.

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