From the Ivory Tower….

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Kevin Kinder Kevin Kinder .

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  • #72038

    TonyAlto
    Muskets: 18,661
    Rank: All-American

    What is both confusing and disturbing is how the coaches
    admit that they were stunned and had no answer as to what
    happened to the offense!?
    That pretty much answers the question of why there were
    NO in game adjustments to correct the situation?
    This seems to be an on going problem!

    With the analysis and critique must come the caveat that most
    of us are at the disadvantage of having to rely mainly on our
    observation of the game! Which reminds of the old Clinton,
    and maybe some media types utterance, “Do you believe me
    or your lying eye?”
    Some things I’d like to see that would lend more insight into
    the WHY of coaches decisions:
    The playbook, or whatever contains the plays available
    Who. created it? Types of run and pass plays? Generic
    or specific vs what type defense? Adjustable as to defense
    in terms of both offensive and defensive personne by coaches
    or audibles by the QB? Redundancy in pass patterns? Blitz
    and full protect options or redundancies? Red zone and field
    Position plays?
    And on and on but the point is we don’t have these and other
    options available to us to answer our questions of WHY!
    Just the results and that INNER feeling that’s something
    doesn’t add up!
    Mainly the score!🙄

    #72040

    wveer85
    Muskets: 4,255
    Rank: Sophomore

    This Staff, in its’ current configuration would have a difficult time
    coaching Alabama to 7 wins.

    #72050
    Kevin Kinder
    Kevin Kinder
    Muskets: 8,975

    Some things I’d like to see that would lend more insight into
    the WHY of coaches decisions:
    The playbook, or whatever contains the plays available
    Who. created it? Types of run and pass plays? Generic
    or specific vs what type defense? Redundancy in pass patterns? Blitz
    and full protect options or redundancies? Red zone and field
    Position plays?
    And on and on but the point is we don’t have these and other
    options available to us to answer our questions of WHY!
    Just the results and that INNER feeling that’s something
    doesn’t add up!
    Mainly the score!🙄

    Most of these questions the coaches won’t answer publicly. Also, HCDH has cut off all access to the assistants other than the OC and the DC.

    But, based on things gleaned in other manners, here are a few answers.

    The playbook, or whatever contains the plays available Who. created it?

    It’s a compilation from many sources. Plays and concepts are taken from others that develop them, and some are developed in-house against specific looks. There’s no one person, or small group, that created it. The answer would be in the dozens, if not hundreds, of people.

    Types of run and pass plays? Generic or specific vs what type defense? Adjustable as to defense in terms of both offensive and defensive personne by coaches or audibles by the QB?

    Don’t know what you mean by “type”, but there are power runs, zone reads, screens, draws, traps, counters, and every route tree. Many plays have options, such as for receivers who adjust their routes based on how the defense is playing them. Plays and blocking assignments are very flexible based on what the defense does. And Will Grier has more freedom to check off than any QB at WVU I’ve covered. Many of the checks are built in, especially in RPOs.

    Redundancy in pass patterns? Blitz and full protect options or redundancies? Red zone and field Position plays?

    I’m not sure what you mean by redundancy in pass patterns. There are different protections that can be run on each play, depending on the defensive front. WVU can keep in a back and a tight end if they are on the field, but there’s a tradeoff there, as it removes one or two receivers from the pattern and makes coverage more difficult. Fully acknowledge that you have to protect the passer first.

    (Side note from ISU game – the Cyclones were getting pressure and sacks with three, four and five man rushes. That indicates more problems with picking up the rushers, as they came from different levels, than with just being outnumbered. I’m in the midst of my video review now – that will be a feature of Wednesday’s Film Room.)

    There are plays for specific spots on the field, especially the red zone, where the corner fade and option route for the quick slant is a staple. Any of those can be run anywhere, but obviously there are some deep routes that can’t be called from the 10-yard line.

    Happy to continue to share and answer these questions as best we can!

    #72055
    Butlereer
    Butlereer
    Muskets: 82,060
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    I’m sure TonyAlto’s questions on the playbook were more general. With all the information we have and the “great” offensive coaches we have we sure wet the bed last Sat. You would think that with the calibre of players we have at the skill positions on O we would be able to pull a couple plays out of the bag of tricks to slow down the ISU rush and/or find routs that would allow us to get a receiver open. We couldn’t even get a few yds on the ground when needed. 1.9 yds/carry is pathetic. This was not a top 25 coached team let alone a team that is ranked #6.

    #72056

    TonyAlto
    Muskets: 18,661
    Rank: All-American

    Thanks, Kevin.
    With such a voluminous playbook that covers many options,
    it’s obvious that a “game plan” must be developed that
    will use a modicum of these plays with variations, geared
    toward the upcoming opponent!?
    If this premise is correct, then the ISU debacle comes down
    to either the game plan was bad or the execution was bad or
    probably a lot of both!? Assuming the game plan wouldn’t
    contain in game adjustments, outside of execution, the
    responsibility falls on Spav or Grier to get the right play call!
    Then execution becomes a factor!
    So there’s a lot of moving pieces here to comprehend and
    co-ordinate! And players to understand!
    Would love to see the nuts and bolts of the fix by HCDH!

    #72062
    Kevin Kinder
    Kevin Kinder
    Muskets: 8,975

    Thanks, Kevin. With such a voluminous playbook that covers many options, it’s obvious that a “game plan” must be developed that will use a modicum of these plays with variations, geared toward the upcoming opponent!? If this premise is correct, then the ISU debacle comes down to either the game plan was bad or the execution was bad or probably a lot of both!? Assuming the game plan wouldn’t contain in game adjustments, outside of execution, the responsibility falls on Spav or Grier to get the right play call! Then execution becomes a factor! So there’s a lot of moving pieces here to comprehend and co-ordinate! And players to understand! Would love to see the nuts and bolts of the fix by HCDH!

    That’s correct. I would say that there aren’t hundreds of plays overall. There are many tweaks to each basic play, such as running them from different personnel groupings and alignments, so you can say that one play is really eight or ten depending on all those different permutations.

    You are also right in that the game plan narrows that down to go against what the opponent runs as its defense, what it has shown in past years against WVU and in its most recent games.

    I think it came down to a couple of different items. 1) WVU couldn’t pick up the rushers from the second level, even when those weren’t “delayed” blitzes. I’ll go into that more in The Film Room on Wednesday. For whatever reason, the OLine and the protection was confused all night, and ISU’s DL and blitzers got into the backfield way too much. On the safety, ISU rushed three, one got held, and another got to Grier to force a throwaway in the end zone, which probably would have been a safety also had the hold not been an obvious call. Three rushers, one gets held, and Grier is still flushed out and on the run. That’s horrendous.

    2) Execution against favorable setups was also spotty at best. WVU had some run hits against a five man box, but had just as many that were one or two yard gains.

    I think more of it comes down to #2. If WVU can’t run against a five man box or pass pro against a four man rush, no play call in the world is going to fix it.

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