Lyons Interview, Part 5: The Future Of Sports On TV Is Still Uncertain

Home forums BlueGoldNews WVU Sports Lyons Interview, Part 5: The Future Of Sports On TV Is Still Uncertain

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  • #65336
    Greg Hunter
    Greg Hunter
    Muskets: 6,596

    Lyons Interview, Part 5: The Future Of Sports On TV Is Still Uncertain Each summer dating back to Fred Schaus, I’ve gotten a chance to sit down with W
    [See the full post at: Lyons Interview, Part 5: The Future Of Sports On TV Is Still Uncertain]

    #65345
    Jeff Cobb
    Jeff Cobb
    Muskets: 3,970

    The thing about going exclusively or predominately to streaming services for content delivery is that it does not take into account all the rural consumers.

    There are a lot of folks who either do not have Internet service at home, or have something that delivers 1Mbps or something so feeble that they either can’t stream or the content is pixilated or buffers.

    Here in Greenbrier County, when you get outside of the Suddenlink bubble, you’re reliant upon Frontier for wireless internet. Those folks are lucky if they can stream Netflix on most days.

    Reliable, robust Internet service is, and will continue to be, an issue for fans of college sports who live in rural areas across the country. Not just West Virginia but ALL rural areas.

    #65351
    Shepherdstown
    Shepherdstown
    Muskets: 23,095
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    Same thing in Jefferson County for me.

    I can watch Netflix or Amazon Prime, but if the kids are back from WVU no way.

    Don’t see it getting better anytime soon.

    #65363
    Greg Hunter
    Greg Hunter
    Muskets: 6,596

    Most believe that if live sports does eventually go to a predominantly streaming model, it is five to 10 years away. And with the leaps technology is making, who knows what Internet delivery services will look like then. I live well out in the country as well, where no cable services venture, and only a few years ago we were still using dial-up. I also hope the technology makes advancements for truly high speed internet, no matter where you live.

    #65371
    Kevin Kinder
    Kevin Kinder
    Muskets: 8,975

    Excellent points. Talked to a couple of people about this at Big 12 media days, and they see it being more of a toe dip, maybe in 2-3 years. Might see a hoop game or two, or an OOC football game.

    The driver in all of this is money, of course. IF Netflix or Amazon or Google throw a total wad of cash, it will be tough for leagues to pass it by.

    I also 100% acknowledge that challenge listed above. Might it also affect rural fans in Oklahoma, Kansas, etc.? Our national Internet connectivity is a disgrace, dominated by the companies and their lobbyists who pay off politicians to keep the laws in their favor. Investment to build out higher bandwith capabilities is similarly terrible.

    #65373
    Butlereer
    Butlereer
    Muskets: 103,615
    Rank: Heisman Winner

    A of the success of streaming venues like Netflix, Amazon Prime etc…. will depend on the cost to watch. Now we can get most FB games on ESPN or ESPN2, Fox, ABC etc. for free. Problem comes when the OOC games are on an alternative channel that is premium. Same will be with streaming channels. Will they be free to us or will the advertisers pick up the cost?

    I’m cheap so I won’t pay for the extras.

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Home forums BlueGoldNews WVU Sports Lyons Interview, Part 5: The Future Of Sports On TV Is Still Uncertain